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Use the finger charts / working charts with your students to help reinforce their practice and memorization of basic operational sequences. This bundle represents hours of work and has been created with love by an AMS trained Montessorian.

 

The Addition Finger Charts or Working Charts are used to practice and memorize unit addition combinations. This resource includes:

  • Finger Chart 1/Control Chart 1 (full control chart)
  • Finger Chart 2/Control Chart 2 (half control chart)
  • Finger Chart 3/Addition Chart 1 (full chart)
  • Finger Chart 4/Addition Chart 2 (half chart)
  • Finger Chart 5/Addition Chart 3 (‘stair’ chart)
  • Finger Chart 6/Addition Chart 4 (blank or mute chart)
  • A set of sums for each of the addition problems to use on the charts

These awesome charts can be used in traditional educational settings without any additional materials to reinforce the memorization and practice of sequences in addition.

 

The Subtraction Finger Charts or Working Charts are used to practice and memorize subtraction combinations. This resource includes:

  • Finger Chart 1/Control Chart 1 (full control chart)
  • Finger Chart 2/Subtraction Chart 1 (full chart)
  • Finger Chart 3/Subtraction Chart 2 (mute or blank chart)
  • A set of differences for each of the subtraction problems to use on the charts

These awesome charts can be used in traditional educational settings without any additional materials to reinforce the memorization and practice of sequences in subtraction.

 

The Multiplication Finger Charts or Working Charts are used to practice and memorize unit multiplication combinations. This resource includes:

  • Finger Chart 1/Control Chart 1 (full control chart)
  • Finger Chart 2/Control Chart 2 (half control chart)
  • Finger Chart 3/Multiplication Chart 1 (full chart)
  • Finger Chart 4/Multiplication Chart 2 (half chart)
  • Finger Chart 5/Multiplication Chart 3 (blank or mute chart)
  • A set of products for each of the multiplication problems to use on the charts

These awesome charts can be used in traditional educational settings without any additional materials to reinforce the memorization and practice of sequences in multiplication.

 

The Division Finger Charts or Working Charts are used to practice and memorize subtraction combinations. This resource includes:

  • Finger Chart 1/Control Chart 1 (full control chart)
  • Finger Chart 2/Division Chart 1 (full chart)
  • Finger Chart 3/Division Chart 2 (mute or blank chart)
  • A set of quotients for each of the division problems to use on the charts

These awesome charts can be used in traditional educational settings without any additional materials to reinforce the memorization and practice of sequences in division. Here you can print your own and go! Save yourself hours of work and lots of money.

 

Loose equations/combinations for all four operations.

You will receive:

Addition: all the equations and sums for the addends 1-9.

Multiplication: all the equations and products for the multipliers 1-10.

Subtraction: all the equations and differences for subtraction combinations 1-18.

Division: all the equally divisible problems for the numbers 1-81 and their quotients.

All of the equations and solutions are in the correct Montessori Math operation colours:

Addition – red

Multiplication – yellow

Subtraction – green

Division – blue

 

To use the material:

Print off in colour on either cardstock, paper, or a solid letter-sized label. If printing on a label, they can be applied to card stock afterward. They could also be printed onto magnets and used in that way.

All stamps are standard 2 cm x 2 cm in size.

Like the actual wooden set, you will get:

– 50 units (green)

– 50 tens (blue)

– 50 one hundreds (red)

– 25 thousands (green)

– 3 sets of 5 zero place holders (in hierarchical colours)

– 3 sets of 10 skittles (in hierarchical colours)

You can print onto card or onto paper and laminate.

I have created a manual for all of the stamp game exercises with dozens of photographs. Save yourself HOURS of work, knowing that a professional curriculum designer and Montessori teacher has designed this resource for your students and children.

 

This material is suitable for any child – whether in a traditional Montessori environment or not.

 

Please reach out if you have any questions. I love to receive feedback and always respond when I get some!

 

Standards

Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them. Mathematically proficient students start by explaining to themselves the meaning of a problem and looking for entry points to its solution. They analyze givens, constraints, relationships, and goals. They make conjectures about the form and meaning of the solution and plan a solution pathway rather than simply jumping into a solution attempt. They consider analogous problems, and try special cases and simpler forms of the original problem in order to gain insight into its solution. They monitor and evaluate their progress and change course if necessary. Older students might, depending on the context of the problem, transform algebraic expressions or change the viewing window on their graphing calculator to get the information they need. Mathematically proficient students can explain correspondences between equations, verbal descriptions, tables, and graphs or draw diagrams of important features and relationships, graph data, and search for regularity or trends. Younger students might rely on using concrete objects or pictures to help conceptualize and solve a problem. Mathematically proficient students check their answers to problems using a different method, and they continually ask themselves, “Does this make sense?” They can understand the approaches of others to solving complex problems and identify correspondences between different approaches.

Determine the unknown whole number in a multiplication or division equation relating three whole numbers. For example, determine the unknown number that makes the equation true in each of the equations 8 × ? = 48, 5 = __ ÷ 3, 6 × 6 = ?.

Use addition to find the total number of objects arranged in rectangular arrays with up to 5 rows and up to 5 columns; write an equation to express the total as a sum of equal addends.

Determine whether a group of objects (up to 20) has an odd or even number of members, e.g., by pairing objects or counting them by 2s; write an equation to express an even number as a sum of two equal addends.

Fluently add and subtract within 20 using mental strategies. By end of Grade 2, know from memory all sums of two one-digit numbers.

Understand the meaning of the equal sign, and determine if equations involving addition and subtraction are true or false. For example, which of the following equations are true and which are false? 6 = 6, 7 = 8 – 1, 5 + 2 = 2 + 5, 4 + 1 = 5 + 2.

Apply properties of operations as strategies to add and subtract. If 8 + 3 = 11 is known, then 3 + 8 = 11 is also known. (Commutative property of addition.) To add 2 + 6 + 4, the second two numbers can be added to make a ten, so 2 + 6 + 4 = 2 + 10 = 12. (Associative property of addition.)

Fluently add and subtract within 5.

For any number from 1 to 9, find the number that makes 10 when added to the given number, e.g., by using objects or drawings, and record the answer with a drawing or equation.

Represent addition and subtraction with objects, fingers, mental images, drawings, sounds (e.g., claps), acting out situations, verbal explanations, expressions, or equations.

Find whole-number quotients and remainders with up to four-digit dividends and one-digit divisors, using strategies based on place value, the properties of operations, and/or the relationship between multiplication and division. Illustrate and explain the calculation by using equations, rectangular arrays, and/or area models.

Multiply one-digit whole numbers by multiples of 10 in the range 10–90 (e.g., 9 × 80, 5 × 60) using strategies based on place value and properties of operations.

Understand that each successive number name refers to a quantity that is one larger.

Understand the relationship between numbers and quantities; connect counting to cardinality.