$2.00 Multi-licenses $1.80

Item description

The Large Number Cards are a versatile resource used with so many of the iconic Montessori math materials. They can also be used in traditional educational settings to teach place value. Here you can print your own.

The Large Number Cards are made with the traditional Montesori hierarchical math colours:

  • the units set contains 9 cards with the numbers 1 through 9 in green
  • the tens set contains 9 cards with the numbers 10 through 90 (by tens) in blue
  • the hundreds set contains 9 cards with the numbers 100 through 900 (by hundreds) in red
  • the thousands set contains 9 cards with the numbers 1000 through 9000 (by thousands) in green


Sizes are approximate and are rounded to the nearest 1/4 cm or inch:

  • units: 3.25 cm x 5 cm / 1.25″ x 2″
  • tens: 6.5 cm x 5 cm / 2.5″ x 2″
  • hundreds: 10 cm x 5 cm / 4″ x 2″
  • thousands: 12.5 cm x 5 cm / 5″ x 2″

You can use these with the Golden Bead Material, stamp game, Introduction to the 4 Operations, and loads of other math games.

This material is suitable for any child – whether in a traditional Montessori environment or not.

Please reach out if you have any questions. I love to receive feedback and always respond when I get some!

Standards

100 can be thought of as a bundle of ten tens – called a “hundred.”

Understand that the three digits of a three-digit number represent amounts of hundreds, tens, and ones; e.g., 706 equals 7 hundreds, 0 tens, and 6 ones. Understand the following as special cases:

The numbers 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, 70, 80, 90 refer to one, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, or nine tens (and 0 ones).

The numbers from 11 to 19 are composed of a ten and one, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, or nine ones.

Compare two numbers between 1 and 10 presented as written numerals.

When counting objects, say the number names in the standard order, pairing each object with one and only one number name and each number name with one and only one object.

Understand the relationship between numbers and quantities; connect counting to cardinality.